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Pure Nostalgia

June 25, 2013

Have you ever found yourself wondering what it would be like to be on the sitcoms we grow up with. That’s a silly question we all know what it would be like, magical! In The Real Housekeepers Of Studio City all the TV housekeepers from our childhood come to life to answer craigslist interview for a new position.

The show starts with Ashley (Lani Shipman) explaining that there is a place more magical than Hollywood, a place where all the shows we grew up watching were filmed. Queue the generic TV intro music and a singsongy “Studio City”. As Ashley dances across the yard and into the house as she explains her dilemma. She needs work, not just work her big break. Enter her children Ethan (Daniel Switzer) and Olivia (Leigh Ann Smith), to complain about something or other, like teenagers always do. Scot (Ryan O’Connor) her neighbor and the “fag to her hag” as he puts it stays for a cocktail after picking the kids up from school. After some back and forth we find out just how serious Ashley‘s situation is. Fortunately her big break is about to come, she just needs a housekeeper.

Ashley receives a call from her agent, her big break! She’s has a call back to be on the real housewives of Studio City. They have one requirement though, she needs a live-in housekeeper. What is she to do, other than turn to craigslist. It’s here where the nostalgia begins. For who answers the ad? None other than our favorite TV housekeepers of course. And in true sitcom format each one imparts an important life lesson through song.

The first interviewee is Nell Harper (Lorie Moore), who imparts an important lesson on self-confidence, in “Shake and Shimmy”. Throughout the show we are visited by Rosey (Gabby Sanalitro) from the Jetsons, Lurch (Matt Musgrove) from The Munsters. Mrs. Garrett (Joe Greene) imparts an important lesson for all parents, how to manipulate your kids. Consuela (Gabby Sanalitro) from Family Guy comes out into the audience and dusts them off. At one point she spritzed me with a water bottle and started dusting my shoulder. Throughout the night there are close to a dozen housekeepers on stage. I want to keep as many of them a surprise as possible. It’s more fun that way.

The Real Housekeepers Of Studio City brings our childhood to the modern era. The housekeepers are given a mature voice to match our new age, but they still come across sweet and caring. The songs and advice they give are meant for an adult, yet there is still a lighthearted air to their advice. I found myself smiling and laughing through the entire show. Characters I grew up with were presented in a new mature light and I was able to reconnect with them, and in so doing reconnect with my childhood.

The songs for each lesson fit the characters singing. If we lived in a fantasy world this might be the advice they would give. The actors and actresses did a wonderful job bringing each character to life. My only qualm is with the actors playing children. When they were on stage but not the focus they seemed a bit too distracting. Ethan (Daniel Switzer) appeared uncomfortable on stage, as if he didn’t fit into the skin of his character. Everyone else was a joy to watch.

If you’re fan of musicals or nostalgia I highly recommend The Real Housekeepers Of Studio City. I for one hope the show is given an extended run after Hollywood Fringe Festival is over.

 

The Real Housekeepers Of Studio City (by Heidi Powers & Tom Moore, Directed by Ryan Bergmann) runs through Hollywood Fringe Festival.

 

For more information please visit:

www.hollywoodfringe.org

From → Reviews

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